Curatio: Apostolate of Catholic Health Care Professionals

Curatio Apostolate

Curatio Apostolate

Curatio members include all those who care for the sick: doctors, nurses, nursing home, hospice and clinic professionals.    

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Instruments of healing

Instruments of healing

Profession, vocation and mission meet and, in the Christian vision of life and health, they are mutually integrated.

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Being Christ to others

Being Christ to others

As we restore our relationship with the sick to one of solidarity and compassion, we respect the inherent dignity of the human person.

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Good Samaritans

Good Samaritans

Like the Good Samaritan  we care for our ‘neighbor in need” seeing Christ in others and being Christ for others.

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St. Gianna our patron

St. Gianna our patron

We celebrate St. Gianna as a witness to the Gospel of Life, with prayer and fellowship on her Feast Day.

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Daily prayer life

Daily prayer life

Members help each other grow in love for Christ and support each other through prayer, liturgy, fellowship and educational opportunities.

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First Friday's of every month are dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and vitally important to us in Curatio, as our mission and vision in health care is "Healing from the Heart of Christ." Prayer and developing a loving relationship with Christ is foundational to our apostolate. Curatio's Chaplain, Father Allan Paul Eilen will offer Mass for the intentions and for the mission of Curatio on Friday, July 3rd.

 

If you have any prayer requests please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Every day of the week a Curatio member offers a Holy Hour for your prayer intentions as well. 

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Save the Date!

On Oct 21, 2015, Curatio, an Apostolate of Catholic Health Care professionals ,   in co- sponsorship with University of St.Thomas Catholic Studies department will present an evening dedicated to Catholic Renewal of End-of -Life Care with speaker Professor Christian Brugger. After addressing some problems in end-of-life care, and inadequate solutions such as the national POLST paradigm, he will discuss rights and obligations associated with dying a holy death.

E. Christian Brugger is a Senior Fellow of Ethics at the Culture of Life Foundation in Washington, D.C. and the J. Francis Cardinal Stafford Professor of Moral Theology at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver, Colorado. He has Master degrees in moral theology and moral philosophy from Seton Hall, Harvard and Oxford Universities and received his D.Phil. (Ph.D.) in Christian ethics from Oxford in 2000.  Christian has published over 200 articles in scholarly and popular periodicals on topics in bioethics, sexual ethics, natural law theory, as well as the interdisciplinary field of psychology and Christian anthropology.  In 2014 he brought out the second edition of his book, Capital Punishment and Roman Catholic Moral Tradition; and he is presently finishing up a book on the Council of Trent's teaching on the indissolubility of marriage, as well as coediting a book of essays on Catholic Social Teaching.  He is a member of the subcommittee of the USCCB Committee on Doctrine charged with revising the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services.  He lives on a farm in Evergreen, Colorado, with his wife Melissa and five children.


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SAVE THE DATE CURATIO RETREAT NOV 6-8, 2015 At Christ the King Retreat Center

More to come! You will not want to miss this retreat ~ Father is a Dominican priest ordained May of 2009 and comes to us from New York , NY.

 Rev. Jonah Pollock, O.P. is currently the Associate Director of the Dominican Friars Health Care Ministry of New York and the Parochial Vicar of the Church of Saint Catherine of Siena.

Here is a brief bio of Father.  Reprinted from the Post Standard written by Renée K. Gadoua, The Post-Standard  May 28,2009 :

Not even bout with brain cancer could keep Chittenango man from becoming a priest

"Jonah Pollock started considering the priesthood when he was a high school student in Chittenango.  Support from his family, study at a Catholic university and surviving potentially fatal brain cancer led him to believe the choice is right for him. "I remember thinking at one point, 'I hope I survive so I can be a priest,'" Pollock said of his illness. Friday, after years of contemplation, prayer and study, Pollock, 29, will be ordained a Dominican priest. He and four other men will be ordained Dominicans -- also known as the Order of Preachers -- at St. Dominic's Church in Washington, D.C. Pollock will celebrate his first Mass at his home parish, St. Patrick Church in Chittenango, at 10:30 a.m. June 7. He joins a worldwide Catholic religious community founded by Saint Dominic in the early 13th century in France. About 300 men serve in the Province of St. Joseph, which is one of four in the country and includes the Northeast, said the Rev. John Langlois, master of students at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. The worldwide community includes about 6,000 men, he said. The training typically takes seven years, including one year of basic training in religious life and six years of study, Langlois said. Pollock's parents, Bart and Mary Pat Pollock, live in Chittenango. He is the second-oldest of six siblings. He is a 1998 graduate of Chittenango High School and a 2001 graduate of Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio. He taught for two years at Holy Cross Academy in Oneida and joined the Dominicans in 2003. Pollock is thought to be the first member of St. Patrick to be ordained in the parish's 140-year history. While the Syracuse Diocese does not track men who join religious orders, the Rev. Joseph O'Connor, director of Office for Vocation Promotion said at least three men in the diocese are participating in programs that will lead to ordination in men's religious communities. O'Connor said most religious orders have emerged during a time of renewal in the church.

As a Dominican, Pollock will report to his order's superior, not a diocesan bishop. O'Connor said. The focus of the two types of priests differs, he said. "The biggest distinguishing factor is most diocesan priests serve in a parish and may live alone," O'Connor said. "Someone who is called first to community life may choose a religious community." No Dominican priests or brothers serve in the Syracuse Diocese. A community of cloistered nuns lives at the Monastery of the Perpetual Rosary on Court Street in Syracuse. "What drew me to this was that the Dominican order places a high emphasis on study," Pollock said. "We study and contemplate the word of God in order to bring it to others." As a member of a large family, he's experienced communal living since childhood, he joked.

Because of his family, he's very conscious that his vocation rules out having a wife and children of his own.

"The life I have been called to is a life that has renounced the goodness of wife and marriage for what I think is a greater love," he said. "I see my life and work as a priest as something that is first of all devoted to a greater love we're all called to as Christians." After ordination, Pollock will return to the Dominican House of Studies for another year of study. As far as the cancer is concerned, he's been healthy for six years. Pollock isn't sure what ministry he'll be assigned to. "I'd be happy to teach. I'd be happy to be in a parish. There are a lot of things I would be happy to do as a priest." 

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Click here to read the article ‘Sharing in the Passion of Christ in Health Care’


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Listen to Father Allan Paul Eilen’s Homily

Read Father Allan Paul Eilen’s Homily

The 23rd World Day of the Sick is a day set aside by the Holy Father to pray for the sick and to honor health care professionals and caregivers.  Pope Francis invites all people of goodwill to reflect upon: “I was eyes to the blind, and feet to the lame” (Job 29:15) and in doing so to consider “sapientia cordis” – the wisdom of the heart… (And it) means being with our brothers and sisters.  Time spent with the sick is holy time.”  

 

If you  are interested in reading  more of the Holy Father’s message see :   MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS FOR THE 23rd WORLD DAY OF THE SICK 2015




Questions about any of our events, or ideas you have to help us in our mission, Please email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Every First Friday Curatio’s Chaplain Father Allan Paul Eilen offers Mass for the intentions and for the mission of Curatio. If you have any prayer request email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and Father will include those intentions. We have Curatio members who offer a Holy Hour one day a week for Curatio- they also will include your prayer intentions.